Saltwater fish species North Carolina

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Each winter, the North Carolina Aquaculture Development Conference draws more than 200 fish farmers, scientists and industry newcomers from across the Southeast to discuss research and current marketing trends for farm-raised fish and seafood. The 2014 gathering will be held in New Bern, Feb. 20-22.

The conference theme, Navigating Currents of Change, focuses attention on how aquaculture fits into emerging consumer markets. The keynote speaker will be Debbie Hamrick, director of specialty crops for the NC Farm Bureau Federation. Hamrick has tracked macro-trends affecting consumer spending and agriculture, including urbanization and the role of millennials as economic drivers. Her address will cover topics such as how to position farm-raised fish into a market dominated by urban consumers, and how to use metrics to determine future demand.

Hamrick is an influential figure in North Carolina's booming local-foods sector. She has served on the statewide Local Sustainable Foods Advisory Council, the North Carolina Catch Board, the aquaculture conference board, and also advises more than a dozen specialty-crops organizations. Prior to joining the Farm Bureau, Hamrick spent nearly 20 years with Ball Publishing and was the founder of FloraCulture International magazine.

A preconference workshop on aquaponics will be offered on Wednesday, Feb. 19. The conference program opens with tours of fish farms and facilities on Thursday, Feb. 20. General presentations and the popular AquaFood Fest, featuring ample quantities of the state's finest farm-raised fish and shellfish, will be held Friday, Feb. 21. The agenda concludes Saturday, Feb. 22 with concurrent workshops on the resources available to succeed in freshwater and marine aquaculture.

About the North Carolina Aquaculture Development Conference
The North Carolina Aquaculture Development Conference is a private, non-profit corporation formed in 1991. It provides support through promotion, marketing and additional services to strengthen, expand and diversify the industries of freshwater and marine aquaculture in North Carolina. The N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services is the lead state agency for aquaculture.


Copper is also toxic to fish, especially

2002-04-04 03:51:43 by MeM

Goldfish. There are several vital dyes that are relatively safe for FRESHWATER fish with ich (I know nothing about saltwater fishes) that are sold in pet stores: methylene blue is very safe for fishes but kills plants. There is a more commonly used drug now, malachite green, which is safe for plants and fairly safe for most fishes. But I believe a few kinds of FW fishes have trouble with it.
If I remember right, you don't have to change the water after using M.G., it naturally breaks down. But you will after M.B., first because it stains the water a deep blue, second because of your plants


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