Pelagic fish in Lake

Fig 2 1METER WOODEN FRAME

Two weeks ago, while delivering an invited talk about our Baikal project at Michigan Technological University located on the south shore of L. Superior, I was struck by the many similarities and important differences between Lakes Superior and Baikal . While at Michigan Tech, I toured the university’s impressive new Great Lakes Research Center and I met with multiple scientists – remote sensing experts, stream ecologists, limnologists, fishery biologists, and algal biochemists – who are probing fascinating processes within L. Superior or its watershed. Also, during my visit, I toured the local area with my hosts, Dr. Charlie Kerfoot and Lucille Zelazny, and through them I learned about the rich history of the local area.

Both lakes are amazingly similar physically, chemically and biologically. For example, both are cold, oligotrophic (low in nutrients) and share similar water transparency and photic zone depths (Table 1). Furthermore, both lakes are responding to contemporary climate change with their surface temperatures warming and duration of winter ice cover shortening significantly. Although both L. Superior and L. Baikal are claimed as the largest in the world, the former is largest in surface area while the latter is largest by volume. Chemically, both lakes exhibit low calcium concentrations with this feature protecting L. Superior from the establishment of the invasive dreissenid mussels, while in L. Baikal low calcium purportedly explains the thin shells of the lake’s small snails. Biologically, the top pelagic fish predators of both of these cold lakes include coregonids (whitefish) while the summer phytoplankton communities are both dominated by autotrophic picoplankters. Finally, much of the watershed of both lakes is surprisingly undeveloped; however, mining is an anthropogenic activity common to both lakes’ watersheds. For example, mining for molybdenum, gold, and other metals is occurring presently in the Selenga River portion of Baikal’s watershed, whereas copper mining occurred throughout much of the 20th century on the south shore of L. Superior, leaving a legacy in the sediments of the littoral zone.

Table 1. Comparison of limnological variables describing Lake Baikal and Lake Superior. Secchi depth and photic zone depths in addition to rates of annual primary production (PPR) and annual surface water temperatures are similar between the two lakes. However, nutrients limiting primary production and the percent of the lakes’ surface area covered in ice each winter differ.

Secchi depth (m) 6-30 15-20
Photic zone depth (m) 60-70 46-60
Annual primary production (mg C m-2 d-1) 235-390 200-350
Limiting nutrients N, P P, Fe
Avg. annual H2O Temp (C)
Avg. % ice cover in winter 100 12-24

The traveling beakfish were fine and they've

2013-04-30 17:59:15 by diverseworld

Been testing everything that has been arriving on Northwest shores for radioactivity and everything has passed thus far.
It really is a shame because Japanese foods have enjoyed a really good reputation for quite a long time and their inspection system is very good. Japan is definitely worried about the impact on the fisheries in particular. I had to re-search pelagic to see that it referred to fish that live near the surface. As in a lot of things, moderation is the key I guess, unless you want to glow in the dark. Here there are warning signs about pike minnows and another fish I don't recall right now in Lake Washington and the way they tend to pick up heavy metals


You might also like:

Pelagic Productions - Jellyfish Lake - …
Pelagic Productions - Jellyfish Lake - …
Guadalupe Yellowfin Tuna fishing
Guadalupe Yellowfin Tuna fishing
FISHING STARS (PART 4)‪ BIG BEAST …
FISHING STARS (PART 4)‪ BIG BEAST …
POPULATION ECOLOGY OF A PELAGIC FISH, XENOMELANIRIS VENEZUELAE (ATHERINIDAE), IN LAKE VALENCIA, VENEZUELA
Book (Ecology)
Jellyfish Drifters - Swarm In Jellyfish …
Jellyfish Drifters - Swarm In Jellyfish …
Jellyfish In Jellyfish Lake
Jellyfish In Jellyfish Lake
Estimates of abundance, biomass, and distribution of rainbow smelt and other pelagic fish in Lake Oahe using hydroacoustic techniques, 1996-1999 / by Wayne Nelson-Stastny.
Book (Missouri River Fisheries Center, S.D. Dept. of Game, Fish, and Parks)

Related posts: