Pelagic fish farming

Ron Wurzer / Getty

A man holds a farmed salmon.

In her book Diet for a Small Planet, Frances Moore Lappe argued more than 35 years ago that grain-fed cattle were essentially "reverse protein factories" because they required many more pounds of plant protein to produce a pound of flesh. Now there's a similar dynamic in the global fish farming, or aquaculture, industry — especially as it strains to satisfy consumers' voracious appetite for top-of-the-food chain, carnivorous fish, such as salmon, tuna and shrimp.

Close to 40% of the seafood we eat nowadays comes from aquaculture; the $78 billion industry has grown 9% a year since 1975, making it the fastest-growing food group, and global demand has doubled since that time. Here's the catch: It takes a lot of input, in the form of other, lesser fish — also known as "reduction" or "trash" fish — to produce the kind of fish we prefer to eat directly. To create 1 kg (2.2 lbs.) of high-protein fishmeal, which is fed to farmed fish (along with fish oil, which also comes from other fish), it takes 4.5 kg (10 lbs.) of smaller pelagic, or open-ocean, fish. "Aquaculture's current heavy reliance on wild fish for feed carries substantial ecological risks, " says Roz Naylor, a leading scholar on the subject at Stanford University's Center for Environmental Science and Policy. Unless the industry finds alternatives to using pelagic fish to sustain fish farms, says Naylor, the aquaculture industry could end up depleting an essential food source for many other species in the marine food chain.


Pelagic Publishing Ltd Amphibian Biology, Volume 11 Part 3: Status of Conservation and Decline of Amphibians: Eastern Hemisphere: Western Europe
Book (Pelagic Publishing Ltd)

Fish Stocks/ Windpower/ Wave Generators

2006-11-14 00:23:43 by jaybug39

I have read that ocean fish stocks will be gone in a few years. And I have been thinking since I heard that Massachusetts refused to build wind turbines in Long Island Sound as they were unattractive, why not build some in the pacific where we could create national sea life refuges?
This would help out coastal communities in several regards. Some people would come see the turbines, much like some people visit lighthouses. The energy produced would ease any difficulties coastal communities may face from their currently existing long distance power transmissions. And they would get the benefit of knowing that fish will be around in the future


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