Hawaiian pelagic fish

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Sep. 21, 2009 — In the open ocean, species of large predatory fish will swim and hunt for food at various depths, which leads to unique diets in these fish. Oceanographers and geologists in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa (UHM) and colleagues have found that those fish that hunt deeper in the open ocean have higher mercury concentrations than those that feed near the surface of the ocean because their deep water food has higher mercury.

This research was detailed in the August 18th early edition of the prestigous journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Mercury is a naturally-occurring trace element distributed throughout the Earth's oceans, land and air. The general public is interested in mercury levels in fish because the organic form, methylmercury, can be toxic at elevated levels if ingested by humans and animals.Mercury enters open ocean food webs, where it bioaccumulates, leading to higher levels in large predatory animals.

Researchers looking at mercury levels in the open ocean have indicated that deeper waters have elevated levels relative to the surface waters. "Bu! ilding o n this information, we thought that deeper-dwelling open ocean animals might have more mercury, as well as the predatory fishes that feed on them, " says Anela Choy, a Department of Oceanography Graduate Student at UHM and lead author in this study. This was indeed the case, and the results of their work show that large pelagic fish like bigeye tuna and swordfish that feed deeper in the ocean have elevated total mercury levels relative to their shallower-dwelling counterparts like yellowfin tuna and mahi-mahi. "We show that this is because the food items that they eat also have varying levels of mercury", continues Choy. "Deeper-living micronekton prey (small fishes, squids, and crustaceans) have higher mercury levels relative to more surface-dwelling prey animals. This is important knowledge for scientists studying animals in the open ocean because it helps them to understand how energy and matter cycle, as well as show who is eating who in the vast, blue water environment. Although not the focus of this study, the results may also help provide information to the fish-consuming public on mercury levels in popular commercial species."


Sea Frontiers 1974 Jan.- Feb. (Pelagic Adaptations, Artificial Reefs, freedom to fish, king of the winged boats, 20)
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Fish Stocks/ Windpower/ Wave Generators

2006-11-14 00:23:43 by jaybug39

I have read that ocean fish stocks will be gone in a few years. And I have been thinking since I heard that Massachusetts refused to build wind turbines in Long Island Sound as they were unattractive, why not build some in the pacific where we could create national sea life refuges?
This would help out coastal communities in several regards. Some people would come see the turbines, much like some people visit lighthouses. The energy produced would ease any difficulties coastal communities may face from their currently existing long distance power transmissions. And they would get the benefit of knowing that fish will be around in the future


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