Endangered Ocean fish list

dsc_0013.jpg Four years ago I asked a waiter at a reputable V&A Waterfront fish restaurant if the catch of the day was orange or green. He was stumped by the question. Had not a clue that I was referring to SASSI’s list of sustainable fish species. It’s a different story these days, with most SA seafood restaurants - and many consumers - asking pertinent questions about the sourcing and status of things that have fins.

A small dinner held at Wild Peacock Food Emporium in Stellenbosch earlier this week launched a new seafood product – Oceanwise sustainable farmed Kabeljou - that Wild Peacock is supplying. In the future consumers will be seeing a lot more farmed sustainable Kabeljou, the fish otherwise known as Dusky Kob. It’s being produced at massive premises adjacent to the East London coastline under the Oceanwise label. In terms of carbon footprint to get it to the Cape, not ideal.dsc_0005.jpg heir East London site for being the most energy-efficient in utilising sea water for their fish-breeding factory at optimum temperatures and water quality parameters, in order to breed sufficient volumes of quality fish for the dinner table. They recycle 10% of water used and treat what is recycled back into the sea so that marine damage is minimised.

Wild-caught stock has spawned farm-reared fish that is available at Wild Peacock in a variety of sizes.dsc_0015.jpg er kilogram currently, placing it out of reach of many consumers, and only suitable for high-end restaurants able to pass on the cost via menu mark ups. The company’s investment in premises large enough to harvest 600 tons of fish per year is part of that price - it takes 12 to 15 months to feed and grow a 15kg fish, aside from the science and technology required. Wild Kob should be 40cm by law. Most Oceanwise fish are bred to over 40cm, and have a full traceability system to prove they have been land-farmed. With oceans increasingly being stripped of fish through controversial line-caught methods, long-term we have few alternatives but to pay accordingly if we want our children to know the taste of fish.

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Random House Books for Young Readers Wish for a Fish: All About Sea Creatures (Cat in the Hat's Learning Library)
Book (Random House Books for Young Readers)

Article Pt 1

2009-06-25 03:13:41 by mee-gan

Many species of open ocean shark are under serious threat, according to an assessment by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).
The Red list gives the status of 64 types of shark and ray, over 30% of which are threatened with extinction.
The authors, IUCN's Shark Specialist Group, say a main cause is overfishing.
Listed as endangered are two species of hammerhead shark, often subject to "finning" - a practice of removing the fins and throwing away the body.
This is the first time that IUCN Red List criteria, considered the world's most comprehensive inventory of the conservation status of plants and animals, have been used to classify open ocean, or pelagic, sharks and rays


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