Beijing Ocean Fish Trading Co

Beijing Grand Ocean Star

This project will convene a scientific symposium in May 2014, bringing together Chinese scientists and Western scientists to discuss the issue of food security and marine fisheries. China relies on marine fisheries to feed a growing population. Its vessels fish on the high seas and in the waters of other nations. In addition, it is the world’s largest consumer of fishmeal, which is produced mainly from wild-caught forage fish and used as feed for pigs and farmed fish. These activities affect global trade and the management of many fisheries. This symposium will explore these connections in four sessions: 1) the sustainability of high-seas fisheries, 2) the impacts of long-distance fishing on other nations, 3) the economics of the global marine fish trade, and 4) the importance of sustainable forage fisheries for aquaculture. Each session will be co-led by one Chinese and one Western scientist. Dr. Rosamond Naylor, the Director of Food Security and the Environment and a professor at Stanford University, and Dr. Ling Cao, a post-doctoral fellow, will host the event at the new Stanford University Center at Peking University in Beijing, China.

Kelly Stewart (National Marine Fisheries Service, Southwest Fisheries Science Center and The Ocean Foundation)

GRANT AWARDED: November 2012. The five species of sea turtles in U.S. waters—all of which are threatened or endangered—are made up of genetically distinct subpopulations, defined by the beaches where the females lay their eggs. Scientists believe that different subpopulations may play distinct roles in the health of the overall population. For example, Atlantic loggerhead turtles hatched in North Carolina and Virginia are 70 percent male, whereas those that hatch in Florida are 70 percent female. Fisheries bycatch of sea turtles is extensive and, until now, there has not been enough information to determine if a particular fishery is disproportionately taking turtles from a single subpopulation, a scenario that would pose greater risk to the overall population. This project will analyze thousands of tissue samples from both U.S. and international fisheries in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and use genetic fingerprinting to identify the native beach of each turtle taken as bycatch. This information will provide the first opportunity to pinpoint specific fishing gears and specific locations that may be disproportionally affecting endangered populations. Managers will then be able to target fisheries that cause disproportionate harm and release fisheries that are less of a threat.


Random House Books for Young Readers Wish for a Fish: All About Sea Creatures (Cat in the Hat's Learning Library)
Book (Random House Books for Young Readers)

Rod, reel, fishing line, hooks, sinkers, bait,

2007-06-05 18:08:29 by needle-nose-pliers

Fishing in ocean usually takes heavier gear, but depends on what kind of fish you are after. Go to the pier where everybody else is fishing and see what they are using. It's really not all that complicated.
Bobbers are helpful for beginners, more often used in freshwater but also can be used in salt water.
Need nose pliers are for removing hook from mouth/throat of fish. The pliers should also be the type that can cut wire - to cut fishing line or even a hook in a pinch.
A cooler with ice or a stringer for holding fish you catch.
A net is useful but not required


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