North Carolina Coastal Fish Limits

North Carolina Fishing

The Atlantic coast states of Massachusetts through Virginia have scheduled hearings to gather public comment on Draft Addendum XXV to the Summer Flounder and Black Sea Bass Fishery Management Plan.

For summer flounder, Draft Addendum XXV includes options that would allow for management measures by region, and the sharing of unused quota, both with the intent of providing more equity in recreational harvest opportunities along the coast.

The specific regions being considered are (1) Massachusetts; Rhode Island through New Jersey; Delaware through Virginia; and North Carolina and (2) Massachusetts and Rhode Island; Connecticut through New Jersey; Delaware through Virginia; and North Carolina.

Under region 1 above for example, Massachusetts would have a five fish bag limit, 16-inch size and 132-day season, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York and New Jersey would all have a four fish bag limit, 18-inch size limit and 135-day season, while Delaware, Maryland and Virginia would each get a four fish bag limit, 16-inch size limit and a 365-day season. North Carolina meanwhile would maintain its six fish, 15-inch size limit and 365-day season.

The quota sharing concept is part of Option 2 in draft Addendum XXV which offers a mechanism to allow the transfer of unused summer flounder quota between states to offset overages or to allow states to liberalize regulations while maintaining the state by state baseline allocations set using MRFSS data from 1998.

The Draft Addendum also proposes two options for the 2014 black sea bass recreational fishery (1) coastwide measures, currently proposed at 13-inch TL minimum size, a five fish possession limit, and a season from June 1 to September 30, or (2) the continued use of management measures by northern (MA-NJ) and southern regions (DE-NC). The regional management approach has been used since 2011.

Saltwater anglers can provide comments by attending one of the following state public hearings, which get underway this evening in Virginia.

Virginia Marine Resources Commission

Contact: Rob O’Reilly at 757-247-2247

Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources

Contact: Steve Doctor at 410-213-1431

Delaware Dept. of Natural Resources & Environmental Control

Contact: John Clark at 302-739-9108

New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife

101 Hooper Avenue

Toms River, New Jersey

Contact: Tom Baum at 609-748-2020

New York State Dept. of Environmental Conservation

East Setauket, New York

Contact: Steve Heins at 631-444-0435

Connecticut Dept. of Energy and Environmental Protection

Old Lyme, Connecticut

Contact: David Simpson at 860-434-6043

Rhode Island Division of Fish & Wildlife

Narragansett, Rhode Island


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Drastic cuts in fish quotas expected

2012-12-20 13:50:31 by Citizen_J


By Beth Daley, Boston Globe, 12/20/12
With fishery regulators poised to impose devastating cuts Thursday on the New England fleet, blame for the disappearance of once-abundant cod and flounder populations is shifting from fishermen to a new culprit: the changing ocean.
Warming waters and an evolving ocean ecosystem possibly related to man-made climate change are contributing to the anemic populations, not just decades of overfishing, government officials say


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